Housing Toolbox for Western Policymakers (Mostly Idaho)

Expanding housing choices has benefits far beyond fair housing compliance; housing diversity is equally important for community and economic development strategies. Housing types and price points that reflect the needs and means of community residents support a more stable labor force and educational system, reduce social costs of poverty, and lead to economic prosperity.

Housing that is affordable to a range of incomes serves as a wage subsidy to local employers.

Housing can be made affordable either by increasing wages or reducing the net costs of housing, which are often influenced by transportation, energy, land, construction, regulatory and financing factors. In some rural Idaho communities, workers must often commute long distances to find housing within their budget, while the cost to heat or cool inefficient housing can exceed rent. So we created the ‘HUT (Housing + Utilities +Transportation) Index’ to hint at real-world cost considerations.

We hope to update and expand these resources to be more useful to local and state policy makers and housing stakeholders. This data can help inform a larger statewide housing needs assessment and resource allocation process. See also “What Every City and County Needs to Know’ for additional information from the 2011 Analysis of Impediments.

County data sets for demographics, poverty and housing/transportation cost burden.

Conducting a local housing needs assessment

U.S. housing market: impressions, impacts and implications

Affordability matters

Housing and Transportation: location-based costs

Tiny Houses and Personal Shelters: implications and opportunities for housing, planning and economic development professionals


NEW! 10/2016 Idaho Chapter/APA Conference Presentations

Next Steps for Small-Footprint Housing

Resources

Communities for Life: Aging-in-Place

Resources

The Changing Face of Fair Housing: Assessment of Fair Housing

Resources

Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (presentation by BBC Research and Consulting)


Center for Budget and Policy Priorities

2016 NW CDI Course—Third Year: Housing as a Second Language