URGENT: Need Masks and PPE for People with Disabilities and Caregivers

During the COVID19 pandemic and mask shortage it’s amazing to see the army of seamstresses, quilters makers and businesses stepping up to help others. Support for front-line health care professionals—doctors and nurses caring for patients—makes everyone proud.

Other groups are in desperate need of masks and other Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), and we need to keep them out of our hospitals at all costs. Persons with disability, seniors and anyone recovering from illness or injury—and their personal assistants—are at high risk for COVID19 and can’t compete for PPE.

In-home personal care professionals assist multiple individuals each day—and few if any have access to masks or other PPE right now.

They need your help—desperately.


How You Can Help

Contact Living Independence Network Corporation (LINC)

Phone: 208-336-3335 | email:

Donated masks will be distributed to high-risk individuals and providers. We need to flatten the curve among this population to support doctors and nurses. Some funds available for materials.

Spread the word! Downloadable flier: PPE4PWD

This project is coordinated among:

Thank you!


“Currently, I have three personal assistants coming in and out of my home who have no protective masks. Also, my friend picks up groceries and medical supplies for me and my other friends with disabilities who have compromised health conditions. He also has a comprised health condition. None of us can find masks”

—Dana Gover, Northwest ADA Center-Idaho

 

COVID19: Resources and information

COVID-19 Buttons and Badges | CDCWhat you need to know about the COVID19 pandemic in Idaho. How it impacts renters and homeowners, fair housing rights and responsibilities, and where to find official information on keeping yourself, your family and your community safe during the pandemic.

We’re all in this together.

Idaho Housing and Finance Association , 565 W. Myrtle Street ...

The Idaho Housing and Finance Association (IHFA) has information for renters and owners using programs or services it administers.

 

The Intermountain Fair Housing Council has created an on-line informational resource for tenants impacted by the COVID19 pandemic and resulting economic downturn and layoffs. View their resource page here.

Idaho-based Gary E. Hanes and Associates is collecting links to COVID19 in multiple languages. View their resource page here.

International Rescue Committee - WikipediaThe International Rescue Committee (IRC) has prepared information on the COVID19 outbreak for Limited English Proficiency (LEP) individuals. See their informational page here.

 

Office of Emergency ManagementIdaho’s Governor Brad Little declared a State of Extreme Emergency and issued a 21-day  Stay At Home Order, closing down all non-essential businesses and services to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. Read more at the state’s official COVID19 page.

 

The National Alliance to End Homelessness is helping coordinate information and resource availability to respond to the CODIV19 outbreak. Homeless populations are among the most vulnerable to community spread and lack the ability to ‘stay at home.’ See their informational page here.

The National Low-Income Housing Coalition is also mobilizing resources and sharing strategies to address increasing housing challenges caused by the convergence of a historic housing crisis and the COVID19 pandemic. View their informational page here.

June 13 Design and Construction Workshop in Boise

Fair Housing Accessibility FIRST

Idaho has been fortunate to host several workshops put on by the excellent trainers at Fair Housing Accessibility First! over the years.

 

We’re excited to announce another chance for those involved in design, construction, development or permitting for the residential environment.

This workshop provides invaluable information for engineers, architects, builders and developers, remodeling contractors and building officials. Learn the basics of design and construction requirements, take a deeper dive into disability rights law and and learn how to make hosing accessible through accommodations and modifications.

As our population ages, we’re all either seniors or seniors in training (if we’re lucky). We need to know how to build a future we and our friends and families can all live with.

Here’s a snapshot from today’s training with attorney Scott P. Moore; thanks to the City of Boise for use of their Council Chambers and for their support of webcasting.


Online webcast link below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FtFzNfsn-nM


Register today!

Registration link here

Download flyer here

View all instruction modules here

Why Economic Developers Hope That “Fair Housing Still Has a Chance Under Trump”

The most recent State of Idaho Assessment of Fair Housing takes an ‘Economic Opportunity Approach’ to what is traditionally perceived as a civil rights issue affecting minority populations and other protected classes. An excerpt follows:

“This study approaches the analysis of fair housing issues through an “opportunity lens.” This was done to:

  • Incorporate recent research that links long‐term economic gains of cities and states to advancing economic growth of residents,
  • Incorporate the latest legal developments around fair housing, and
  • Most importantly, identify where the Grantees can best intervene to improve the economic opportunities of residents and, ultimately the fiscal health, of non‐entitlement communities.”

In other words, the report shows that the overall economic health and stability of a city or state depend on the economic opportunities of all residents. When everyone can access safe, quality housing within their household budget and close to employment or other services, they have more time, energy and income to invest in neighborhoods and communities. At the same time, they are less dependent on public assistance or other social services.

Housing choice (the right to determine where we live and can afford) and stability are essential components in the development of social capital, sometimes defined as “the networks of relationships among people who live and work in a particular society, enabling that society to function effectively.”

When individuals and families feel part of a neighborhood or community, they are better able to form trusting relationships and cultivate connections that can lead to opportunities—whether in employment, education, health care or personal growth and development. From the perspective of those who stress personal responsibility and self-reliance, housing choice (aka, ‘Fair Housing’) should be seen as the best investment, hands down.

For an informative and riveting history of the origin and reason for the Fair Housing Act, this 2015 podcast from This American Life and ProPublica is one of the best introductions around. For those short on time, Act Two is particularly fascinating.

The Slate article linked below contemplates the 2015 Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing  (AFFH) rule and how it may fare moving forward under a new administration. The AFFH rule is intended to implement the core mission of the Fair Housing Act—to increase access to economic and social opportunities through something called housing choice. Where we live determines access to essential services and resources: clean air and water, healthy food, education, employment, police and fire protection, banking and lending, health care—even things like culture and recreation.

“An important rule, enacted late in the Obama administration, is just starting to knock down barriers in some of America’s most segregated places.”

The Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (or AFFH) rule, promulgated by President Barack Obama’s Department of Housing and Urban Development in 2015, marked the first forward momentum for the Fair Housing Act in decades. The rule required jurisdictions that receive federal housing funding to not only document barriers to integration and opportunity, but to detail—and prioritize—policies to eradicate them.

Read more here: Fair Housing Still Has a Chance Under Trump