Local Bus Panels, Videos Promote Fair Housing

The City of Boise Fair Housing Task Force and regional Forum partners are getting the word out about fair housing and the 2-1-1 referral option! Look for these bus panels and posters on bus benches around the valley, and help us spread the word about fair housing resources and protection!

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Fair Housing Posters

To download the fabulous posters created during this campaign, select from the links below to download and print either English or Spanish.

And remember to share the corresponding fair housing videos sponsored by Idaho Housing and Finance Association (IHFA).

 

Fair Housing Hotline and Campaign Go Statewide

Campaign posters available in English and Spanish. To request copies, email gro.a1553007577fhi@c1553007577rih1553007577

Idaho Housing and Finance Association (IHFA) and the Idaho Department of Commerce (IDOC) are expanding a proactive fair housing awareness campaign recently launched in the Treasure Valley to cover the balance of Idaho. IHFA contributed to initial efforts by the City of Boise to develop the campaign, which features a partnership with Health and Welfare’s 2-1-1 line. This creates an easy-to-remember resource directing callers with discrimination or compliance questions to statewide and regional experts. The campaign slogan ‘Good Neighbors + Fair Housing = Stronger Communities’ can be seen in outdoor displays, and is being featured on both radio and television through public service announcements. Continue reading

Refugees and Fair Housing Law – What every provider should know

One of the many challenges refugees and their sponsoring agencies face is securing decent, safe and affordable housing near public transportation and employment. For some, western housing construction, layout and systems take some getting used to; that’s a cultural and social issue, and can be addressed with case management. Another issue involves credit and background checks required by most, if not all, landlords and property management companies.

Refugees were in fact responsible and successful homeowners in their native country prior to forced relocation, although as mentioned above ‘home’ may not have resembled what we picture in Idaho. They can succeed here as well, and contribute to our communities and economy if given the chance. Every refugee receives temporary cash and/or housing assistance for a few months upon arrival, and are expected to become self-reliant in a few short months. They also receive extensive case management and support from local resettlement agencies to secure employment and adjust to life in their new community.

Fair housing law requires housing providers to treat every applicant equally, and that places a burden on them to document credit, rental and criminal history for each applicant without exception. It is important to know that official refugee status (Section 207 of the Immigration and Nationality Act), provides “immediate lawful status with all the rights and privileges of a U.S. citizen (except the right to vote or work for a government entity.)

Some property managers relying on partial or misleading information about renting to refugees have paid a high price. It’s worth the time to double-check the facts to reduce liability and the resulting legal costs.

Accepting alternate documentation.We all need to expand our concept of ‘documentation’ to remain compliant as this situation evolves. Refugees are brought into this country for resettlement by the U.S. State Department, and extensively vetted for two years or more by the Department of Homeland Security, United Nations Refugee Agency and other law enforcement agencies. Here are some examples of alternate documentation:

Alternate Documentation

To get the facts and contacts regarding renting to refugees, download:

refugees housing brochure

or contact the following agencies:

Agency for New Americans (208) 338-0033
Idaho Office for Refugees (208) 336-4222
International Rescue Committee (208) 344-1792
English Language Center (208) 336-5533

See also useful refugee housing/communications resources at: