Poor Planning Creates Barriers

Beyond a focus on Fair Housing law, we all need to be aware of barriers to community mobility as well. During a 2019 access audit of a new subdivision in Boise’s Harris Ranch, planning and design barriers were evident throughout the ‘walk and roll’ event. From the absence of Greenbelt access indicators to steep connecting ramps, missing or misaligned curb cuts, and even surface materials, we encountered multiple opportunities for improved mobility and access.

Steel bridge decking poses barrier for those living with disability, trapping wheels and discouraging guide dogs. #boiseTake the bridge decking in the photo at left. The openings are the perfect size to trap small front wheels on a manual chair or swallow the tip of a cane. It’s also a surface service dogs might perceive as unsafe. This is a perfect example of the need to include a range of voices in the planning process. Problems can be addressed before injury occurs.

Until you’ve tried to navigate your community without full vision, hearing or mobility, access is often an afterthought. And remember, construction can create life-threatening barriers and hazards, as in this 2018 story about ongoing problems with road construction in and around Boise.

Where the Sidewalk Ends: Boise construction zone tricky for people with disabilities

Highway signs in the path of travel can trip a pedestrian or force them into the roadway. This is not a mere incovenience; it can create a life-threatening situation. We all need to increase our access awareness and take an active role in creating barrier-free communities.

Navigating a maze of randomly placed construction barriers.

ACHD contractors place barricades and signs at random, creating seious hazards for pedestrians and cyclists.

June 13 Design and Construction Workshop in Boise

Fair Housing Accessibility FIRST

Idaho has been fortunate to host several workshops put on by the excellent trainers at Fair Housing Accessibility First! over the years.

 

We’re excited to announce another chance for those involved in design, construction, development or permitting for the residential environment.

This workshop provides invaluable information for engineers, architects, builders and developers, remodeling contractors and building officials. Learn the basics of design and construction requirements, take a deeper dive into disability rights law and and learn how to make hosing accessible through accommodations and modifications.

As our population ages, we’re all either seniors or seniors in training (if we’re lucky). We need to know how to build a future we and our friends and families can all live with.

Here’s a snapshot from today’s training with attorney Scott P. Moore; thanks to the City of Boise for use of their Council Chambers and for their support of webcasting.


Online webcast link below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FtFzNfsn-nM


Register today!

Registration link here

Download flyer here

View all instruction modules here

Idaho Transportation Draft Plan Public Open Houses

Idaho Transportation Department

You are invited to review the draft Idaho Transportation Plan and share ideas that will help shape your community and future developments. See more details here.

Each of the Idaho Transportation Department’s six districts will feature an open house to review the DRAFT version of the statewide Public Transportation Plan. This plan address public transportation in Idaho and sets goals and strategies for the next five years for the Idaho Transportation Department’s Public Transportation Office as well as the public transportation providers.

Contact: 208-334-8822 or

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Great Turnout for March 14 Design and Construction Training with Doug Anderson

With 165 confirmed participants in the Boise City Council Chambers—and dozens more following via webcast—we’re very happy with the attendance for this year’s Design and Construction Training. We want to thank the City of Boise and our Fair Housing Forum partners around Idaho for helping us deliver this important training to those who can use it.

The Boise venue drew a large percentage of architects, with additional representation from the building and development industry, and even a civil engineer!

Trainer Doug Anderson with LCM Architects brings decades of experience relative to the creation and implementation of Fair Housing and Access regulations. Prior to his work with LCM, Doug served on the U.S. Access Board, the federal agency responsible for developing guidelines under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) from 2003 to 2011. He chaired the Board from 2009 to 2010.

The Idaho training is one of ten nationwide events sponsored by HUD during Spring of 2017, and organized by Fair Housing Accessibility FIRST, an initiative promoting compliance with the Fair Housing Act design and construction requirements. The program offers comprehensive and detailed instruction programs, useful online web resources, and a toll-free information line for technical guidance and support.