Idaho Fair Housing Month Activities

“Fair Housing Month is a time to recommit to our nation’s obligation to ensure that everyone has equal access to safe, affordable housing,” —HUD Secretary Marcia L. Fudge.

Idaho Fair Housing Forum members have long coordinated training and special events during Fair Housing Month, and 2021 is no different!

April 5 – Racism in Land Use discussing history, maps and redlining, restrictive deeds and CC&Rs, and FHA protections (hosted by the University of Idaho and the Intermountain Fair Housing Council). Learn more or register here.

April 6 – Basics of Fair Housing.* Attorney David Penny with Tomlinson & Associates provides an overview of the Fair Act and its implications for housing professionals in this online, 75-minute presentation.

April 13 – Fair Housing: Real Estate Focus.* Attorney David Penny with Tomlinson & Associates presents fair housing information for Real Estate Professionals in this online, 75-minute presentation.

April 20 – Fair Housing for Transitional Housing and Shelter Providers.* Attorney Eric Steven of Eric Steven Law Office in Spokane describes the unique challenges and best practices for those assisting unhoused populations.

April 27 – Limited English Proficiency Basics for Federally Assisted Programs and Services.* Gary Hanes of Gary E. Hanes & Associates, LLC will outline what managers of federally assisted programs—particularly assisted housing—should consider as they work to address clients, tenants or stakeholders with limited English proficiency, or LEP.


View IHFA’s 2021 Fair Housing Videos here.*

Request IHFA Fair Housing Outreach Materials here.*

See HUD’s 2021 Fair Housing Month statements here.

*The work that provided the basis for these publications and training was supported by funding under a grant with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The substance and findings of the work are dedicated to the public. The author and publisher are solely responsible for the accuracy of the statements and interpretations contained in this publication. Such interpretations do not necessarily reflect the views of the Federal Government.

Spring 2021 Fair Housing Training

Thanks to a FHIP-EOI Grant from HUD, IHFA is hosting a series on Fair Housing aimed at housing providers and professionals. The first two Spring 2021 sessions are described as Intermediate-level content for those with a basic understanding of fair housing essentials.

It is strongly recommended that you attend a Fair Housing Basics Event prior to the Intermediate sessions, or you can click here to watch this HUD-produced Fair Housing Basics video training by Kristina Miller.

The third session is an open format to offer participants a chance to explore specific questions or situations.

Session Recordings (posted after session completion)

  • March 16, 2021 | Intermediate Session 2 video | Chat file
  • March 23, 2021 | Advanced Q&A video | Chat file

Session Materials

More sessions scheduled for April, 2021 (w Tomlinson Associates Attorney David Penny)

  • April 6, 2021 | Fair Housing Basics for Housing Professionals
  • April 13, 2021 | Fair Housing Basics for Housing Professionals
  • April 20, 2021 | Fair Housing for Transitional Housing and Shelter Providers

Follow us on Twitter @FairHouseForum or Facebook Idaho Fair Housing Forum

Check out our Fair Housing video series in English and Spanish and visit idahohousing.com/fair-housing

Neighbor-on-neighbor hate crimes violate Fair Housing Act

Indiana Man Pleads Guilty to Hate Crime for Making Racially Motivated Threats Toward Black Neighbor and to Unlawful Possession of Firearms

Many people assume the Fair Housing Act only applies to situations involving landlord/tenant interactions or the sale, purchase or advertising of housing. But the Act also applies in cases of tenant-on-tenant or neighbor-on-neighbor harassment.

Shepherd Hoehn, 51, plead guilty to “criminal interference with housing rights and a weapons charge” (firearms possession while a habitual user of marijuana is illegal under Indiana and federal law). Hoehn made threats based on race to intimidate his neighbor and to intimidate someone exercising his right to fair housing in violation of 42 U.S.C. § 3631. The guilty plea is the latest action in the case since the FBI exercised a federal search warrant on Hoehn’s property on July 1, 2020.

“Hoehn’ s hateful and threatening conduct, motivated by racial intolerance, is an egregious crime that will not be tolerated by the Justice Department,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Pam Karlan of the Civil Rights Division. “Every person has a right to occupy, enjoy and feel safe in their homes, regardless of race, color or national origin. We will continue to protect the civil rights of all individuals and vigorously prosecute hate crime cases.”

Hoehn was found guilty of displays intended to intimidate and threaten his neighbor, including a cross burning; placing Nazi symbolism and threatening racial slurs on his fence, blasting racially charged music toward the neighbor’s home, and pelting the neighbor’s home with eggs.

“Hoehn’s sentencing date has not been set at this time. Hoehn faces a maximum statutory penalty of 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000 for each of the charged offenses.”

Read more here: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/indiana-man-pleads-guilty-hate-crime-making-racially-charged-motivated-threats-toward-black

Ending Discrimination Would “Supercharge the Economy.”

…if you could give me one thing to do to supercharge the economy, I would say, end discrimination across the American economy. Discrimination is holding back our economy. It’s holding back our middle class.

Title in large red block letters against plain off-white background: The Riches of This Land: The story of what went wrong and how to get it back. Author Jim Tankersly

This is the conclusion of journalist Jim Tankersley, who covers economics and tax policy and recently published The Riches of This Land: The Untold, True History of America’s Middle Class.

He has spent over a decade studying the American middle class; how it became a symbol of the American Dream following World War II, how the middle class built one of the world’s most powerful economies, and how powerful interests undermined the gains of the working class. From the 1950s through the 80s, middle-class households with a single income earner could afford a home, car, health care, a college education…even vacations and retirement savings.

The erosion of the middle class means that today, most full-time workers are underwater as full-time work too often leaves many in poverty and debt. At the start of 2021, analysis indicates the extended pandemic and recession have resulted in the Sharpest Rise in Poverty Rate in More Than 50 Years. 

…if you were to design a recession to hurt most the people who have most helped to build the American middle class, you would design basically this one.

Tankersley advocates for policies that help those people responsible for the growth and productivity of the middle class from the 50s through the 80s, which he describes as, “women of all races…men of color and immigrants.” We hear time and again that these are the workers hurt most in the current recession. Women are the default caregivers when schools and child care centers are closed; they are most likely to care for elderly parents, and they the most likely to lose employment opportunities or promotions as a result.

Next to women, people of color and immigrants—often serving as essential workers—have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19, the lack of health care and sick leave, and the cascading impacts on employment options. This follows a steady decline in purchasing power and stability over the past 40 years.

This perspective draws the same conclusion as those pursuing economic resilience from a fair housing approach, which recognizes the access to opportunity afforded by housing types and price points distributed across regions, communities and neighborhoods. When everyone has access to stable housing and essential community assets, we all benefit from better overall health outcomes, increased productivity, and more people moving from public assistance to family supporting, gainful employment.

In his interview with Fresh Air co-host Dave Davies, Tankersley notes that, “…if you could reduce discrimination across the economy and invest in each other’s success, then we really could see this upward flow of talent and this boom of job creation and growth.”