Northwest ADA Center Regional Conference in Boise Sept. 19, 20

(From the DBTAC site):

Communities Celebrating Equal Access and Employment Through the ADA

Learn how the Americans with Disabilities Act in 2013 is reshaping opportunities for citizens with disabilities.  The Northwest ADA Regional Conference will bring together an impressive array of speakers to Boise, touching on many of the topics important to our work and play.

Whether you run a business, manage a hotel, work for local government, or have a disability and want to enjoy the recreational opportunities of Idaho, this conference offers excellent information.  Hear experts from the Department of Justice, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the Access Board, and from the Job Accommodation Network, as well as regional authorities.

Idaho in September is beautiful and registration is limited. Check out the agenda and speakers to confirm that this conference is the one you don’t want to miss.

Featuring Nationally Recognized Speakers:

Sally Conway
U.S. Department of Justice

Beth Loy
Job Accommodation Network

Peggy Greenwell
U.S. Access Board

Sharon Rennert
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

Richard Pimentel
Nationally Renowned Speaker and Advocate

This two-day event will be held at The Grove Hotel in downtown Boise, ID. The conference will offer four keynote sessions as well as 16 breakout sessions on a variety of topics, including:

  •     Employment and People with Disabilities
  •     Role of the ADA Coordinator/ADA Title II
  •     Accessible Outdoor Recreation
  •     Effective Communication
  •     Assistive Technology
  •     Service Animals

Regisratation Cost: $175
(includes lunch and refreshments)
Register Here

Conference Location
The Grove Hotel
245 S. Capitol Blvd
Boise Idaho 83702

Room Block is available at the Hampton Inn & Suites Boise
Room rates are $130 Online hotel registration

For Content Information:
John Dineen 

For Registration Information:
Tammi Olson 

The role of housing in implementing Olmstead, and why it matters to everyone

The 1999 Olmstead decision clarified the court’s intent to afford persons with disabilities the opportunity to live independently in and as part of the larger community, which in turn means access to opportunities available to all persons.

To quote from the ruling, the goal is to seek “the most integrated setting appropriate to the needs of qualified individuals with disabilities” or “a setting that enables individuals with disabilities to interact with non-disabled persons to the fullest extent possible.”

Housing is key to community integration, as where we live determines our access to a host of essential community services. HUD’s message on this is also clear:”Individuals with disabilities, like individuals without disabilities, should have choice and self determination in housing and in the health care and related support services they receive. For this reason, HUD is committed to offering individuals with disabilities housing options that enable them to make meaningful choices about housing, health care, and long-term services and supports so they can participate fully in community life.”

There are many efforts underway in Idaho to achieve the aims of Olmstead, and will take communication and coordination among all partners to create a diverse mix of housing choices throughout the state’s many regions. Housing alone doesn’t make a community accessible, but it’s a really good place to start.

Read more here: Olmstead and housing

Ramp Up Idaho

Where access meets opportunity; Ramp up, and watch business roll in.

Welcome! This space is for working documents and other files for RampUpIdaho partners. We are a diverse group of community and economic professionals exploring the economic impact of accessible retail, commercial and housing infrastructure throughout Idaho.

Draft RUI brochure for review 8_20

(please take a look at this and let Erik know if we need to make any changes before it goes to the printer this week – 8/22)

For partners. If you have large files to share with the group and they are currently online, send me a link and I’ll re-post here.

What does access look like? Just for fun, here’s a lo-res video clip of the first scooter/chair use of a ramp IHFA had constructed (in partnership with the good people at Boise Parks and Recreation) between our east parking lot and Julia Davis Park. The historic gate was not wheelchair accessible, so our building manager worked closely with the BP&R reps and our contractor a few years ago to create a better option. It has made a big difference!

First scooter through the gate

Time Sensitive! Pedestrian Curb Ramp Program apps due May 1

The Idaho Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Pedestrian Curb Ramp Program Application and Program Guide for the 2013 application cycle have been released. The application and reference materials for this funding opportunity can be found at the I-Way website: http://i-way.org/announcements/2013-curb-ramp-application-and-overview.

Deadline for submittal of the application is: May 1, 2013 at 5:00 PM MST.

If you have questions concerning this application, please contact Shauna DeMeritt () at ITD’s Division of Transportation Performance Program Development Team.

RampUpIdaho Materials

2013 Pedestrian Curb Ramp Program and Application

The Idaho Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Pedestrian Curb Ramp Program Application and Program Guide for the 2013 application cycle have been released. The application and reference materials for this funding opportunity can be found at the I-Way website:

http://i-way.org/announcements/2013-curb-ramp-application-and-overview.

Deadline for submittal of the application is: May 1, 2013 at 5:00 PM MST.

If you have questions concerning this application, please contact Shauna DeMeritt () at ITD’s Division of Transportation Performance Program Development Team.